Hatena::ブログ(Diary)

himaginaryの日記

2011-12-17

スティグリッツの構造改革論

|

スティグリッツがヴァニティ・フェアに書いた大恐慌および大不況に関する記事(H/T Mostly EconomicsEconomist’s View)が波紋を呼んでいる。

以下はその抜粋。

...the inability of the monetary expansion to counteract this current recession should forever lay to rest the idea that monetary policy was the prime culprit in the 1930s. The problem today, as it was then, is something else.

...

The underlying cause was a structural change in the real economy: the widespread decline in agricultural prices and incomes, caused by what is ordinarily a “good thing”—greater productivity.

...

Government spending unintentionally solved the economy’s underlying problem: it completed a necessary structural transformation, moving America, and especially the South, decisively from agriculture to manufacturing. Americans tend to be allergic to terms like “industrial policy,” but that’s what war spending was—a policy that permanently changed the nature of the economy. Massive job creation in the urban sector—in manufacturing—succeeded in moving people out of farming.

...

Mainstream macro-economists argue that the true bogeyman in a downturn is not falling wages but rigid wages—if only wages were more flexible (that is, lower), downturns would correct themselves! But this wasn’t true during the Depression, and it isn’t true now. On the contrary, lower wages and incomes would simply reduce demand, weakening the economy further.

...

Two conclusions can be drawn from this brief history. The first is that the economy will not bounce back on its own, at least not in a time frame that matters to ordinary people.

...

Monetary policy is not going to help us out of this mess. Ben Bernanke has, belatedly, admitted as much. The Fed played an important role in creating the current conditions—by encouraging the bubble that led to unsustainable consumption—but there is now little it can do to mitigate the consequences. I can understand that its members may feel some degree of guilt. But anyone who believes that monetary policy is going to resuscitate the economy will be sorely disappointed. That idea is a distraction, and a dangerous one.

What we need to do instead is embark on a massive investment program—as we did, virtually by accident, 80 years ago—that will increase our productivity for years to come, and will also increase employment now. This public investment, and the resultant restoration in G.D.P., increases the returns to private investment. Public investments could be directed at improving the quality of life and real productivity—unlike the private-sector investments in financial innovations, which turned out to be more akin to financial weapons of mass destruction.

...

The private sector by itself won’t, and can’t, undertake structural transformation of the magnitude needed—even if the Fed were to keep interest rates at zero for years to come. The only way it will happen is through a government stimulus designed not to preserve the old economy but to focus instead on creating a new one. We have to transition out of manufacturing and into services that people want—into productive activities that increase living standards, not those that increase risk and inequality.

...

The second conclusion is this: If we expect to maintain any semblance of “normality,” we must fix the financial system. As noted, the implosion of the financial sector may not have been the underlying cause of our current crisis—but it has made it worse, and it’s an obstacle to long-term recovery. Small and medium-size companies, especially new ones, are disproportionately the source of job creation in any economy, and they have been especially hard-hit. What’s needed is to get banks out of the dangerous business of speculating and back into the boring business of lending. But we have not fixed the financial system. Rather, we have poured money into the banks, without restrictions, without conditions, and without a vision of the kind of banking system we want and need. We have, in a phrase, confused ends with means. A banking system is supposed to serve society, not the other way around.

(拙訳)

・・・金融拡張策が現在の不況対策において無力であることは、1930年代において金融政策が(大恐慌を引き起こした)主犯であったという考えを永遠に葬り去ることになる。今日の問題を引き起こしているのは、当時と同じく、何か別のものなのだ。

・・・

大恐慌の)根本的な原因は、実体経済における構造変化であった。農業分野の価格と収入が広範囲に亘って下落したが、それは通常は「良いこと」とされることによってもたらされた。即ち生産性の上昇である。

・・・

政府支出は意図せずして経済の根幹的な問題を解決した。それは米国、特に南部地域において、決定的な形で農業から製造業への構造転換を完了させた。米国人は「産業政策」という言葉に拒絶反応を示すが、戦争における財政支出はまさにそれだった。その政策によって経済の性格が恒久的に変化したのだ。都市部の製造業での大規模な雇用創出は、人々を農業から移動させることに成功した。

・・・

主流派マクロ経済学者は、経済が悪化している時に真に問題となるのは、下落していく賃金ではなく、硬直的な賃金だ、と論じる。賃金がもっと伸縮的ならば(即ちもっと低下すれば)、経済の悪化は自然に食い止められる、というわけだ! しかし大恐慌の時期にそのことは真実ではなかったし、現在においても真実では無い。むしろ逆に、賃金や収入の低下は単に需要を減らし、経済をさらに弱めてしまう。

・・・

こうした歴史の概観からは2つの結論が得られる。第一は、経済は自然には回復しない、ということだ。少なくとも一般の人々の時間の枠内ではそうだ。

・・・

金融政策は現在の苦境から我々を救い出すことはできない。ベン・バーナンキは、遅まきながら、その点を認めた。FRBは、持続不可能な消費をもたらしたバブルを促進することにより、現在の状況を作り出す上で大きな役割を果たしたが、その帰結を和らげるために彼らが現在できることはほとんど無い。彼らが罪悪感を多かれ少なかれ感じていることは理解できる。しかし、金融政策経済を回復できると考えている人は、皆失望の憂き目に遭うだろう。その考えは的外れであり、危険でさえある。

代わりに我々がすべきことは、今後の生産性を高めると同時に現在の雇用も増やすような大規模な投資政策――80年前たまたま実施したような――の発動である。そうした公共投資ならびにそれによってもたらされるGDPの回復は、民間投資の収益率を向上させる。公共投資は、生活の質と真の生産性の改善に向けることができる。その点で、金融大量破壊兵器に近いことが判明した金融技術革新への民間投資とは違うのだ。

・・・

民間部門は自分では必要な規模の構造転換を実施できないし、その意思も無い。たとえFRBが今後何年もゼロ金利政策を続けたとしてもだ。その転換が起きるのは、古い経済を保持する代わりに新しい経済を創り出すことに重点を置いた政府の刺激策によってのみである。我々は製造業から脱却し、人々にとって必要なサービス業へと移行しなくてはならない。リスクと格差を増大させるような活動ではなく、生活水準を向上させる生産的な活動への移行である。

・・・

第二の結論は、「通常時」の状況を少しでも維持したいのであれば、金融システムを修復せねばならない、ということだ。前述したように、金融部門の内部崩壊は現在の危機の根本原因では無いが、危機を悪化させ、長期の回復の妨げとなっている。中小企業、特に新興企業は、どんな経済においても雇用創出において不釣合いなほど大きな役割を果たすが、そうした企業が今回の危機で大きく痛手を蒙った。必要なのは、銀行を投機という危険な業務から抜け出させ、融資という退屈な業務に引き戻すことだ。しかし我々は未だに金融システムを修復していない。我々がやったのは、銀行に無制限かつ無条件に資金を注ぎ込む、ということだけだ。我々がどんな銀行システムを要求ないし必要としているのか、というビジョンもそこには無かった。一言で言えば、目的と手段を取り違えていたのだ。銀行システムは社会に奉仕すべきであって、その逆では無い。

現在におけるFRBの政策の有効性を否定したということで、当然ながら市場マネタリストは反発している(Nick Roweスコットサムナー邦訳])。また、市場マネタリストでは無いが、ライアン・アベントも批判的である


ちなみに、タイラー・コーエンは、スティグリッツの議論は少しアーノルド・クリングのPSSTっぽいと評しているが、RoweはPSSTとはまったく違うと書いている。食糧への需要は価格に対し非弾力的であるというのがその理由のようだが、同じ理由で労働塊の誤謬*1とも少し違う、とも書いている。


一方、デロングは、スティグリッツの議論に賛成はしないが、Roweの言うほど不整合な議論とは思えない、とスティグリッツをやや擁護している。そして、スティグリッツが貯蓄投資恒等式を重視するヴィクセリアンなのに対し、Rowe貨幣の数量方程式を重視するフィッシャリアンなのが両者の議論が噛み合わない原因ではないか、それを統合すべきなのが我々ヒックシアンなのだが…、とコメントしている。


[追記]

小生の解釈では、両者の議論が噛み合わない原因は、Roweらはあくまでも均衡を前提とした話をしているのに対し、スティグリッツが不均衡から均衡に至る過程の枠組みで話をしていることにあるように思われる。たとえば(注記で触れた)労働塊の誤謬に関する以前の小生のエントリで紹介したように、生産性の上昇による不均衡が短期的にはあり得るのではないか、という小生の疑問に対しRoweは、「もし価格と賃金が完全に伸縮的ならば(あるいは、もし金融政策が総供給の増加を総需要の増加によって対応するならば)経済は直ちに新しい均衡に移るはずだ」と断言している。その意味で、ここで紹介したトービンの言葉を借りれば、両者はそもそも違う戦場で戦っている、ということになるのかもしれない。


また、コーエンが今回のスティグリッツの議論との類似性を見い出したPSST(旧姓「再計算理論」)も、ここで紹介した「住宅ブームは長期に亘って段階的に進むのに対し、その崩壊は短期間である、という非対称性」というクリングの指摘、および、ここで紹介した「先進国では、新しい産業が高度に複雑なので、それに適した技術の習得に時間が掛かり、職を失った労働者が直ちにシフトするわけにはいかない」というクリングの問題意識に鑑みると、やはり不均衡分析の話として考えるべきかと思われる。


なお、Roweは価格メカニズムの不在を以ってスティグリッツの論議をPSSTとまったく違うと見做しているようだが、その判断は少し性急に過ぎるように思われる。というのは、ここではてぶしたノアピニオン氏のPSSTを敷衍した議論にあるように、価格メカニズムを初めとする従来の経済学ロジックとは別の次元にPSSTは立っているというのが一つの解釈だからである。特にノアピニオン氏の

Is it possible that fiscal policy is really just industrial policy? Could it be that World War 2 ended the Depression not because it represented a sufficiently large Keynesian stimulus, but because it deliberately created new industries and new technologies that formed the basis of a new sustainable pattern of specialization and trade?

という記述が、今回のスティグリッツ第二次世界大戦の解釈と大きく共通していることには驚かされる(ただしそのエントリの「Arnold Kling and Tyler Cowen are generally on board with my characterization, but are skeptical of government's ability to conduct effective industrial policy.」という追記によると、PSSTの生みの親のクリング自身やコーエンは産業政策との関連付けには懐疑的とのことだが、それはPSST理論そのものというよりは彼らのリバタリアン的な立場に由来する懐疑論であろう)。

*1cf. ここ

ぴっちゃんぴっちゃん 2012/01/23 13:33 私はRoweの考えはハナから的外れで話にならないと思っていますが、かといってスティグリッツがニュー・ケインジアンであるとして、ニュー・ケインジアンに特徴的な前提を考慮すると、
What we need to do instead is embark on a massive investment program—as we did, virtually by accident, 80 years ago—that will increase our productivity for years to come
のあたりからの主張もすごく引っかかるんですが。
公共投資と来たところまではいいのですが、目的等そこから先についてはニュー・ケインジアンの考えはもとのケインズやサーカスの考えとだいぶ違っているようで危なっかしいです。
金融・資本市場改革についてはスティグリッツの言う方向性でいいと思いますが。