Hatena::ブログ(Diary)

himaginaryの日記

2012-11-09

ハリ・サージェントになりたくて

|

昨日までサージェントインタビューから数学的な理論に纏わる話を紹介してきたが、今日はサージェントの経済史家としての側面に焦点を当てた部分を紹介する。

Evans and Honkapohja: Your papers on monetary history look very different than your other work. Why are there so few equations and so little formal econometrics in your writings on economic history? Like your “Ends of Four Big Inflations” and your paper with Velde on features of the French Revolution? We don’t mean to insult you, but you look more like an “old economic historian” than a “new economic historian.”

Sargent: This is a tough question. I view my efforts in economic history as pattern recognition, or pattern imposition, exercises. You learn a suite of macroeconomic models that sharpen your mind by narrowing it. The models alert you to look for certain items, e.g., ways that monetary and fiscal policy are being coordinated. Then you read some history and economic history and look at a bunch of error-ridden numbers. Data are often error-ridden and incomplete. You read contemporaries who say diverse things about what is going on, and historians who put their own spins on things. From this disorder, you censor some observations, overweight others. Somehow, you impose order and tell a story, cast in terms of the objects from your suite of macroeconomic theories. Hopefully, the story rings true.

Evans and Honkapohja: Do you find rational expectations models useful for understanding history?

Sargent: Yes. A difficult thing about history is that you are tempted to evaluate historical actors’ decisions with too much hindsight. To understand things, you somehow have to put yourself in the shoes of the historical actor and reconstruct the information he had, the theory he was operating under, and the interests he served. Accomplishing this is an immense task. But our rational expectations theories and decision theories are good devices for organizing our analysis. By the way, to my mind, reading history immediately drives you away from perfect foresight models toward models in which people face nontrivial forecasting problems under uncertainty.

Evans and Honkapohja: Interesting. But you didn’t answer our question about why your historical work is more informal than your other work.

Sargent: I don’t know. Most of the historical problems that I have worked on have involved episodes that can be regarded as transitions from one rational expectations equilibrium to another. For example, the ends of hyperinflations; the struggles for new monetary and fiscal policies presided over by Poincare and Thatcher; the directed search for a new monetary and fiscal constitution by a sequence of decision makers during the French Revolution; the eight-hundred-year coevolution of theories and policies and technologies for producing coins in our work with François on small change. I saw contesting theories at play in all of these episodes. We didn’t see our way clear to being as complete and coherent as you have to be in formal work without tossing out much of the action. Analyzing the kinds of the transitions that we studied in formal terms would have required a workable model of the social process of using experience to induce new models, paradigm shifts and revolutions of ideas, the really hard unsolved problem that underlies Kreps’s anticipated utility program. (You wouldn’t be inspired to take Muth’s brilliant leap to rational expectations models by running regressions.) We didn’t know how to make such a model, but we nevertheless cast our narratives in terms of a process that, with hindsight, induced new models from failed experiences with old ones.


(拙訳)

Evans and Honkapohja
貨幣の歴史に関する論文は、あなたの他の論文とは随分違うように思われます。経済史に関するあなたの論文には、なぜ方程式や正規の計量経済学があまり無いのでしょうか? 「四大インフレーションの終焉」*1や、ヴェルデとのフランス革命の特徴に関する論文*2がそうですよね? 侮辱の意図はありませんが、あなたは「新しい経済史家」ではなく「古い経済史家」のように見えます。
サージェント
難しい質問ですね。私は経済史に関する自分の仕事を、パターン認識ないしパターンを当てはめる作業として捉えています。自分の思考を研ぎ澄ますようなマクロ経済モデルを一通り習得するためには、思考の対象範囲を限定することになります。それらのモデルは、財政金融政策の協調方法といった特定の項目にあなたが目を向けるように仕向けます。それからあなたは歴史や経済史に目を通し、誤差の大きな数字の集合を眺めます。データはしばしば誤差が大きく、かつ不完全です。そして、起きていることに関して思い思いのことを口にする同時代人の書いたものを読み、物事に独自の捻りを加える歴史家の書いたものを読みます。こうした混乱の中で、あなたはある観測事実を捨て去り、別の観測事実を重視します。どうにかこうにか秩序を課して、物語を紡ぎ出し、それをあなたのマクロ経済理論の枠に嵌め込むのです。その物語が人々に本当らしく聞こえることを願いながら、ね。
Evans and Honkapohja
合理的期待モデルは歴史を理解するのに役に立ちますか?
サージェント
ええ。歴史で難しいことは、登場人物の決断を後知恵で判断し過ぎる傾向に陥りやすい点です。物事を理解するためには、とにかく歴史の登場人物の身になって考え、彼の持っていた情報や彼の従っていた理論や彼の利害関係を再構築する必要があります。これを成し遂げるのは大仕事です。ただ、我々の合理的期待理論や意思決定理論は、そうした分析をまとめる道具として優秀です。ちなみに私の考えでは、歴史に足を踏み入れるや否や完全予見モデルから離れ、人々が不確実な状況下で些細とは言えない予測の問題に直面するモデルに引き寄せられることになります。
Evans and Honkapohja
興味深いお話です。しかし、あなたの歴史に関する研究が他の研究に比べ正規性に欠けるという我々の問いにまだお答えを頂いていません。
サージェント
その答えは私も分かりません。私が研究した歴史問題の大部分は、ある合理的期待均衡から別の合理的期待均衡への遷移と見做せる事例を伴っています。例えば、ハイパーインフレの終焉がそうです。ポアンカレ*3サッチャーが推し進めた新しい財政金融政策に向けた奮闘もそうです。フランス革命の最中に歴代の意思決定者が指示した新たな財政金融体制への模索もそうでした。私とフランソワの小額貨幣に関する共同研究*4で描いた、硬貨の生産を巡る800年に亘る理論と政策と技術の共進化もそうです。そうした事例ではすべて、理論同士の競合が起こりました。かなりの省略をしなければ、正規の研究がそうあるべき完全かつ整合的なものとはなりそうもありませんでした。我々が研究したような遷移を正規な形で分析するには、社会過程の使えるモデルが必要でした。経験から新しいモデル、パラダイムシフト、思想革命を生み出すようなモデルです。これは、クレプスの予期された効用計画の根底にある非常に難しい未解決の問題です(ムースの合理的期待モデルへの素晴らしい知的跳躍は、回帰を何本か走らせることによって促されはしないのです)。我々にはそのようなモデルを作る方法が分かりませんでした。然は然り乍ら、後世からすると古いモデルでの失敗の経験から新しいモデルを生み出していたように見える過程として、物語を紡いだのです。

*1cf. ここ。邦訳は「合理的期待とインフレーション」所収。

*2cf. ここ

*3cf. Wikipedia

*4cf. 原論文、および書籍(下記)とそのケイトー研究所書評

The Big Problem of Small Change (Princeton Economic History of the Western World)

The Big Problem of Small Change (Princeton Economic History of the Western World)

トラックバック - http://d.hatena.ne.jp/himaginary/20121109/Evans_Honkapohja_interview_with_Thomas_Sargent12