Haas effect

音楽

Haas effect

はーすえふぇくと

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Haas effect

Though the effect is quite straight forward it has a formal name, the Haas effect. The Haas effect is named after Helmut Haas who formally researched the effect in a paper that was first translated into english in 1949. I have been unable to find the date of original German publication. The effect works only on a mono track. You could sacrifice the left or right channel of a stereo track and apply it to the remaining mono channel. Pan your audio track hard left or hard right. It doesn’t matter which extent you choose but you must pan the track 100% to that side. The sound will be coming out of only one speaker. You then send a copy of the audio signal to the other speaker but delay it slightly. I don’t have a reference to Haas’ original work and most online sources differ slightly, but it seems this delay should be no longer than 25-40 milliseconds. This sounds a bit complex talking about sending audio to one speaker and delaying a copy in the other speaker. It really is quite simple once you break it down. There are a few ways to do this described in order from most simple to most complex.

Haas effect sound samples

  • dry keyboard
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    This is the dry, original keyboard part we were working with. Its timbre is a little drab and doesn’t cut through the mix well.
  • keyboard with Haas effect
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    This is the above sample with the Haas effect applied at 18ms. Sounds much cooler and it sits in the mix really well.
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