Hatena::ブログ(Diary)

potasiumchの日記

2008-03-04

SFAA翻訳 [13-1]-[13-5]

| 05:22 | SFAA翻訳 [13-1]-[13-5]を含むブックマーク


 Science For All Americans翻訳プロジェクトにちょっと参加してみる。『Science For All Americans』という本(Webにも全文公開されている)がとても素晴らしいので、日本語でも読めるように勝手に翻訳しようというプロジェクト。id:sivad さんが提案され黒影さんがプロジェクト立ち上げ・マネージメントをされているもの。



 訳したのは個人的に興味のある第13章の初めのほう([13-1]-[13-5])。


第13章 効果的な学習と教育


 「Science For All Americans」は生徒が何を学ぶべきかを重要視しているが、科学がどのように教えられるかもそれと同様に重要なことだと認識している。授業計画を考える際、効率的な教師は、日々解明が進む学習の性質についての研究成果や、長年吟味されてきた指導法に関する高度な知識を利用する。通常、彼らは学習内容についての特別な性質、生徒の経歴、そして教育や学習が行われる場の状況を考慮する。


 この章では−―系統的でなく網羅的とも言えないが――このような教師のやり方を特徴付ける、学習と教育についてのいくつかの原則について述べる。それらの原則の多くは学習と教育について一般に適応できるものであるが、そのうちのいくつかは特に科学、数学そして技術の教育に重要なものである。簡便のため、ここでは学習と教育は別の項で紹介するが、それらは密接に関連するものである。



学習の原則

教育した内容が必ずしも学習されるわけではない。

 認知科学の研究は次のことを解明しつつある―良いと思われる指導法を使ったとしても、非常に優れた学問的才能を持った生徒も含む多くの生徒が、私たちが思っているほどは授業内容を理解していない。真剣にテストを受ける生徒は、一般に彼らが教えられたことや読んだものを確認できるとされる。しかしよく観察すると、彼らの理解は、必ずしも全てが間違いではないにしても、限定的なものか歪んだものであることが多い。このことは、教育目標を設定する際には節減が重要であることを示唆している。学校は、最も重要な概念や技能を選びそれを強調することで、生徒が情報の量ではなく理解の質を上げることに集中できるようにするべきである。



生徒が学ぶことは彼らの中に既にある考え方に影響される。

 教師や本がどんなに明確に物事を伝えるかにかかわらず、人は自分の中で固有の意味を形成する必要がある。ほとんどの場合、人は既に持っている考え方と新しい情報を結びつけることによってこの意味形成を行う。生徒が考える世界観との間に複数の結びつきが生じないような概念(人の思考の基本的な単位)は、すぐに忘れられてしまうか、有用なものにならない。あるいは、もし彼らがそれを記憶にとどめていたとしても、それらは例えば「生物学、1995年」と書かれた頭の中の引き出しにしまわれ、世界の別の側面に関する考え方に影響を及ぼすことは出来ない。概念は、様々な文脈の中で遭遇し様々な方法で表現されるときに最も良く学習されるのであり、それは生徒の知識体系に組み込まれる機会を増やすことにもなる。


 しかし、効果的な学習のためには、新しい考え方と古い考え方を結びつける以上のことが要求されることがある。時には、考え方の劇的な再構築が必要とされる。つまり、新しい考え方を受け入れるために、生徒は彼らが既に知っている物事の間のつながりを変化させるか、更には長年培ってきた世界観のある部分を捨て去ることが必要になる場合がある。この必要不可欠な知識の再構築の代替策は、新しい情報を歪ませて古い考え方と馴染むようにするか、あるいは新しい情報を完全に拒絶してしまうことである。生徒は彼らが出会うほとんど全ての事柄について、自分独自の考え方を持って学校に来る。あるものは正しく、あるものは間違っている。もし彼らの直感や誤解が無視されるか深く考えずに拒絶されてしまうと、往々にして彼らの元々の信念の方が長期的には勝ち残ってしまう―たとえテストでは教師が望む答えを出していようと。単に矛盾を提示するだけでは不十分であり、新しい視点がいかに世界をより合理的に理解するために役に立つかを教えることで、生徒が新しい視点を発達させる後押しをする必要がある。



(原文)

Chapter 13: EFFECTIVE LEARNING AND TEACHING


Although Science for All Americans emphasizes what students should learn, it also recognizes that how science is taught is equally important. In planning instruction, effective teachers draw on a growing body of research knowledge about the nature of learning and on craft knowledge about teaching that has stood the test of time. Typically, they consider the special characteristics of the material to be learned, the background of their students, and the conditions under which the teaching and learning are to take place.


This chapter presents―nonsystematically and with no claim of completeness―some principles of learning and teaching that characterize the approach of such teachers. Many of those principles apply to learning and teaching in general, but clearly some are especially important in science, mathematics, and technology education. For convenience, learning and teaching are presented here in separate sections, even though they are closely interrelated.Top button


PRINCIPLES OF LEARNING

Learning Is Not Necessarily an Outcome of Teaching

Cognitive research is revealing that even with what is taken to be good instruction, many students, including academically talented ones, understand less than we think they do. With determination, students taking an examination are commonly able to identify what they have been told or what they have read; careful probing, however, often shows that their understanding is limited or distorted, if not altogether wrong. This finding suggests that parsimony is essential in setting out educational goals: Schools should pick the most important concepts and skills to emphasize so that they can concentrate on the quality of understanding rather than on the quantity of information presented.


What Students Learn Is Influenced by Their Existing Ideas

People have to construct their own meaning regardless of how clearly teachers or books tell them things. Mostly, a person does this by connecting new information and concepts to what he or she already believes. Concepts―the essential units of human thought―that do not have multiple links with how a student thinks about the world are not likely to be remembered or useful. Or, if they do remain in memory, they will be tucked away in a drawer labeled, say, "biology course, 1995," and will not be available to affect thoughts about any other aspect of the world. Concepts are learned best when they are encountered in a variety of contexts and expressed in a variety of ways, for that ensures that there are more opportunities for them to become imbedded in a student's knowledge system.


But effective learning often requires more than just making multiple connections of new ideas to old ones; it sometimes requires that people restructure their thinking radically. That is, to incorporate some new idea, learners must change the connections among the things they already know, or even discard some long-held beliefs about the world. The alternatives to the necessary restructuring are to distort the new information to fit their old ideas or to reject the new information entirely. Students come to school with their own ideas, some correct and some not, about almost every topic they are likely to encounter. If their intuition and misconceptions are ignored or dismissed out of hand, their original beliefs are likely to win out in the long run, even though they may give the test answers their teachers want. Mere contradiction is not sufficient; students must be encouraged to develop new views by seeing how such views help them make better sense of the world.

blackshadowblackshadow 2008/03/05 21:55 こんばんは。黒影です。
当翻訳プロジェクトへご参加いただき、どうもありがとうございます。
みなさんのおかげで順調に翻訳が進んでいますので、これからもどうぞよろしくお願いいたします。

potasiumchpotasiumch 2008/03/06 23:01 黒影さんはじめまして。
プロジェクト立ち上げおつかれさまです。微力ながら参加させていただきます。こちらこそよろしくお願いします。

トラックバック - http://d.hatena.ne.jp/potasiumch/20080304
Connection: close